Sparktheoffer.com Launches Online Marketplace to Offer Unique Services to …

Boca Raton, FL — (SBWIRE) — 07/24/2012 — With more people today looking for creative ways to make money online, SparkTheOffer.com is the newest online marketplace to buy and sell online jobs. SparkTheOffer.com allows members to offer online services at a fraction of the typical cost compared to other online services. SparkTheOffer.com is designed specifically for individuals looking to make extra money online or purchase jobs at a discounted rate.

Buying and selling using online marketplace platforms is still a relatively new phenomenon and millions around the world are making money to supplement their incomes or provide a safety net between jobs. SparkTheOffer.com offers a simplified online marketplace platform to bring users together either looking to offer or looking to purchase an online service. It’s simple, the ideas and offers speak for themselves and the profile provides additional information. Offers can range from $5 for a quick skype phone call to $200 for a new logo for their start-up.

“There are millions of people who want to earn money even if the amount is small. You can use these type of services to offer your unique service to the online world,” said Ethan Goldman, Spokesperson for SparkTheOffer.com. “By creating a simplified platform to find people online, SparkTheOffer.com is geared towards the freelance professional with a skill to offer and the business professional with a need to purchase that skill.”

Registration at SparkTheOffer.com is free and sellers can post an unlimited amount of offers to be purchased. Like similiar sites, SparkTheOffer.com takes a 15 percent fee and is only paid for successfully sold and completed offers. Sellers also have the ability to upgrade their offer by using 1 of 3 extra services to maximize their services.

Unlike a large handful of micro job sites that forces sellers to offer services for a set price, SparkTheOffer.com allows its sellers to offer services at a varied pricing structure, letting sellers put a real-time value on the services they offer online.

Goldman adds, “The unique aspect with micro job sites is that no matter how many other similar sites users are signed up with they can still sign up with other online services. If a seller has the time and the ability, why not offer their skills and services on every site available?”

About SparkTheOffer.com
SparkTheOffer.com was founded in 2012 and is a free online marketplace to find and hire people with the same shared interest. For more information visit http://www.SparkTheOffer.com

New Orleans City Hall has a phantom Department of Miscellaneous

Every year or two, a New Orleans City Council member comes up against the fact that the citys budget contains a Department of Miscellaneous, and his or her head begins to spin. For Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer, that moment came Thursday. The council was considering an ordinance to set the salary range for the job of deputy chief information officer, and Palmer wanted to know both why it will be part of the Department of Miscellaneous and why it will be unclassified, meaning a mayoral appointment and not a civil service position.

Mo. Lottery has no strategy to reap extra money

The Missouri Lottery has no strategy to generate an additional $35 million that state officials had hoped would help balance the budget and avoid cuts to government services, a lottery official said Tuesday.

The Lottery, which transferred a record $280 million to public schools during the recently concluded fiscal year, has a goal of generating nearly $289 million for education during the fiscal year that began July 1, Lottery spokesman Gary Gonder told The Associated Press.

That would be an increase of a little more than 3 percent. But it would fall far short of the $324 million in Lottery proceeds that had been projected by budget analysts for the Legislature and governor.

The budget passed by the Republican-led Legislature and signed by Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon had assumed that an extra $35 million in lottery proceeds could supplant general revenues allotted for education, freeing up money that could avoid cuts in other areas. But lawmakers left it to the Lottery to determine how to generate that additional money.

A nearly $289 million target is an aggressive goal, to be honest with you, said Gonder, the chief operating officer for sales, marketing and communications at the Missouri Lottery. Were going to do everything we can to reach that goal and to surpass it.

He acknowledged that the Lottery has no particular strategy for hitting the higher mark of $324 million, though he said the agency has plans to increase marketing and expects more money from new ticket vending machines.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Kurt Schaefer said Tuesday that legislators had received assurances earlier this year that the Lottery would be able to reach the higher figure.

Im still under the belief that theyre going to deliver on those numbers, said Schaefer, R-Columbia. Obviously if they dont, well have to re-evaluate some funding issues.

During their session that ended in mid-May, lawmakers embraced a rosier than usual projection for Lottery revenues as part of a complicated money transfer benefiting the states veterans nursing homes. That plan, signed into law by Nixon, redirects casino fees that had gone to early childhood programs to veterans homes. Early childhood programs now are to get $35 million annually from the states share of a settlement with tobacco companies.

Lawmakers hoped the Lottery could generate an extra $35 million for education, thus freeing up general revenues that had been allotted for schools to be diverted to programs that previously received tobacco funds and to plug holes elsewhere in the budget.

Nixons budget director, Linda Luebbering, said Tuesday that she had explained the need for the extra $35 million to Lottery officials, but Luebbering also has acknowledged previously that the target would be challenging to hit. When he signed the budget last month, Nixon cited uncertainty over the Lottery funding as one of the reasons he believed the budget was unbalanced and that some spending restrictions were necessary.

Lottery revenues came in better than expected during the 2012 fiscal year. The state carried over $8.6 million of extra Lottery funds into the current fiscal year, Luebbering said. But that still means the Lottery would have to generate more than $26 million on top of its $289 million goal for education.

During this years legislative session, some lawmakers proposed that the Lottery could transfer more money to public schools by decreasing the amount it paid in prizes, but others feared that could backfire since reduced prizes could lead to a decline in Lottery ticket sales. Other lawmakers suggested that the Lottery could give a greater percentage away in prizes, thus driving up sales and the overall amount of Lottery revenues.

But ultimately, the Legislature decided not to dictate to the Lottery how it should come up with the extra money.

Gonder said the Lottery is doing several things that it hopes will help meet its target of $289 million of revenues for education. Among them are new Powerball and Mega Millions promotions and new vending machines that can sell a greater number of Lottery games.

The Lottery also is encouraging retailers to display more Lottery games on their counter space and to start selling new games as soon as they become available. Gonder said the Lottery also plans to devote a greater percentage of revenues to prizes _ 79 percent instead of 76 percent _ on a new Scratchers game that will debut in August, hopefully helping to increase sales.

Kibaki assents to amended Miscellaneous Bill

President Mwai Kibaki Friday, assented to amongst other laws, the Statute (Miscellaneous Amendments) Act 2012 after Parliament deleted the contentious clauses.

The President had rejected the Bill passed by the National Assembly last month citing matters pending before the courts.

The Head of State signed the Bill into law after Parliament effectively deleted Sub-section 1(a) to Section 51 of the Political Parties Act, No. 11 of 2011 which sought to legitimize what has popularly come to be known as Party Hopping.

Parliament also deleted Sub-sections (2) and (3) of Section 22 of the Election Act, No.24 2011 which raised the minimum qualification to hold political office to the level of university education.

The Act also contains a raft of other significant developments, for instance;

Tourism industry brings money, jobs, and savings to Illinois in 2011

MARION, Ill The state of Illinois is a record-breaking place when it comes to travel and tourism in 2011. The industry brought in an extra $2.5 billion compared to the previous year. Thats an increase of almost 8.5 percent.

Jan Kostner, Illinois travel director, said the a surge in leisure travel fueled the increase.

Illinois contains a unique combination of midwestern offerings that you can only find here.

The land of Lincoln uses a magazine, TV, the Internet and a radio marketing campaign to help drive national and international travelers to the state.

When were not advertising, our numbers go down, said Kostner. So, we know that out of sight is definitely out of mind.

Tourism dollars also helped create over 4,000 jobs in the state. The extra tourists in Illinois are also putting extra money in the pockets of the people who live there.

If we didnt have this, people coming here spending money, and we had no benefits from hotel tax, eating, dining, and shopping, a family of four would pay $1,100 more each year in taxes to make up for that, Kostner said.

Its extra money, savings and jobs that can help pepole living in Illinois bounce back from the recession.

Miscellaneous tariff bill keeps Nebraska manufacturers competitive

One of the bright stars, though, remains our ag economy, driven by expanded trade and finding new markets abroad for Nebraska products. 

As an advocate of increased international trade and a member of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Trade, I am committed to reducing taxes and tariffs to increase trade and American competitiveness in a global economy.

In the past, Congress acted to close our borders, believing doing so would protect US manufacturing and producers. 

Multinational manufacturing and international supply chains have evolved, though, and we now know free and fair trade is economically advantageous for America and Nebraska.

To keep pace with our international competition, Congress developed the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB) to temporarily suspend previously levied import taxes on necessary manufacturing inputs which are not sold or available in the US  Suspending these tariffs reduces the cost of US manufactured goods, making them more affordable and attractive to domestic and international consumers.

The reduced cost of production benefits consumers both here and abroad, protecting jobs at home and reducing our trade deficit.  The largest category of goods imported into the United States is not consumer goods, but capital goods used to create value-added finished products. 

For example, Nebraska manufacturers import raw materials not found in the US, and then export their manufactured products to consumers around the world, benefiting our local economy.

The MTB process also fosters more competition between domestic producers because prohibitive tariffs can prevent smaller start-up businesses from gaining a foothold in an industry.

The MTB supports an estimated 90,000 jobs, increases US production by $4.6 billion and expands US GDP by $3.5 billion.  Congress must renew the MTB by the end of this year to expand opportunities for US manufacturers to benefit from suspended duties on imports. 

Failure to act only benefits foreign manufacturers who do not face the same punitive tariffs.

In the past, the duty suspension process has been conducted with little transparency, raising concerns the bill could be open to earmarks or limited tariff benefits to a single entity. 

However, I have supported an updated process developed in the Ways and Means Committee to increase transparency and ensure the MTB is in accordance with House Rules and the earmark moratorium.

The MTB provisions now are fully vetted by the public, the independent International Trade Commission and the Executive Branch before being included in the final bill. 

The additional steps ensure the proposed tariff suspension would not be limited to a few entities, but instead available to anyone wishing to import the product.

Despite the unprecedented transparency of this process, some continue to call for Congress to cede this authority to the Executive Branch.  Providing more unchecked authority to an already bloated Executive Branch, however, would be misguided. 

The MTB process promotes good government, allowing Congress to carry out its constitutional responsibility to “lay and collect taxes and duties,” under Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, while providing an open process for individuals to submit public comments.

Given the weak state of our economy, Congress should use any and all means to reduce burdens imposed by government to encourage private sector growth and jobs. 

Congress can accomplish this goal in part by passing an MTB before the end of the year to give certainty to manufacturers and promote American exports and competitiveness.

Miscellaneous Debris

Miscellaneous Debris

Posted

Live Arts and Philly Fringe artists get around:

>>>James Franco talks Gatz at the Huffington Post. Elevator Repair Service returns to the 2012 Live Arts Festival with Arguendo.

>>>Young Jean Lees Church is conquering the eastern seaboard from Maryland to Cape Cod. She also talked to Riff Raff about her first concert, and teaching actors to rock star their way through tough tough situations. Her UNTITLED FEMINIST SHOW runs at Live Arts this fall.

>>>Rafael Lozano-Hemmers Open Air gets plugs in the Art Newspaper and Apartment Therapy. And Rafaels just about everywhere this year. After his installation on the Parkway this fall, Rafael will bring Frequency and Volume, an installment in his Relational Architecture series, to the US for the first time. At SFMOMA.

>>>David Orlansky and Joshua Levin, two teachers laid off by the Philadelphia School District, will send up their past gig at the 2012 Philly Fringe, with Awesome Alliteration: The Magical Musical. For eliminating all literary devices from the schools, they earn a nod as Stars of David. Wait, wasnt I one of those in a past life?

Nicholas Gilewicz

Mo. Lottery has no plan for extra money

By DAVID A. LIEB

Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Missouri Lottery has no strategy to generate an additional $35 million that legislative leaders and Gov. Jay Nixon’s administration had hoped would help balance the budget and avoid cuts to government services, a lottery official said Tuesday.

The Lottery, which transferred a record $280 million to public schools during the recently concluded fiscal year, has a goal of generating nearly $289 million for education during the fiscal year that began July 1, Lottery spokesman Gary Gonder told The Associated Press.

That would be an increase of a little more than 3 percent. But it would fall far short of the $324 million in Lottery proceeds that had been projected by budget analysts for the Legislature and governor.

Republican legislative leaders and the Democratic governor’s administration had hoped an extra $35 million in lottery proceeds could supplant general revenues budgeted for education, freeing up money that could avoid cuts in other areas. But lawmakers left it to the Lottery to determine how to generate that additional money.

A nearly $289 million target “is an aggressive goal, to be honest with you,” said Gonder, the chief operating officer for sales, marketing and communications at the Missouri Lottery. “We’re going to do everything we can to reach that goal and to surpass it.”

He acknowledged that the Lottery has no particular strategy for hitting the high mark, though he said the agency has plans to increase marketing and expects more money from new ticket vending machines.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Kurt Schaefer said Tuesday that legislators had received assurances earlier this year that the Lottery would be able to reach the higher figure.

“I’m still under the belief that they’re going to deliver on those numbers,” said Schaefer, R-Columbia. “Obviously if they don’t, we’ll have to re-evaluate some funding issues.”

During their session that ended in mid-May, lawmakers embraced a rosier than usual projection for Lottery revenues as part of a complicated money transfer benefiting the state’s veterans nursing homes. That plan, signed into law by Nixon, redirects casino fees that had gone to early childhood programs to veterans homes. Early childhood programs now are to get $35 million annually from the state’s share of a settlement with tobacco companies.

Lawmakers hoped the Lottery could generate an extra $35 million for education, thus freeing up general revenues that had been allotted for schools to be diverted to programs that previously received tobacco funds and to plug holes elsewhere in the budget.

Nixon’s budget director, Linda Luebbering, said Tuesday that she had explained the need for the extra $35 million to Lottery officials, but Luebbering also has acknowledged previously that the target would be challenging to hit.

Lottery revenues came in better than expected during the 2012 fiscal year. The state carried over $8.6 million of extra Lottery funds into the current fiscal year, Luebbering said. But that still means the Lottery would have to generate more than $26 million on top of its $289 million goal for education.

During this year’s legislative session, some lawmakers proposed that the Lottery could transfer more money to public schools by decreasing the amount it paid in prizes, but others feared that could backfire since reduced prizes could lead to a decline in Lottery ticket sales. Other lawmakers suggested that the Lottery could give a greater percentage away in prizes, thus driving up sales and the overall amount of Lottery revenues.

But ultimately, the Legislature decided not to dictate to the Lottery how it should come up with the extra money.

Gonder said the Lottery is doing several things that it hopes will help meet its target of $289 million of revenues for education. Among them are new Powerball and Mega Millions promotions and new vending machines that can sell a greater number of Lottery games.

The Lottery also is encouraging retailers to display more Lottery games on their counter space and to start selling new games as soon as they become available. Gonder said the Lottery also plans to devote a greater percentage of revenues to prizes — 79 percent instead of 76 percent — on a new Scratchers game that will debut in August, hopefully helping to increase sales.

A welcome cash boost!

Any extra money that Carlisle can generate is always welcome, so to get this from the sale of a former player is even better.

Carlisle will gain a slice of money following the £1m plus move from Coventry to Derby by former defender Richard Keogh.

Compensation was gained by Carlisle when he left the club for Coventry on a Bosman, but a clause will also allow them (and another former club Bristol City) to gain a cut of the transfer money received by The Sky Blues.

How much money, and when this will start coming in, is no known although it is reported that this will come in stages over the next three-years.

It all helps though!

Howzat? Vital Cricket is here!

Click here to join in the debate on the club forum.

No extra money for car industry: Combet

Industry Minister Greg Combet will not be giving the car industry any new federal funding, despite Ford Australia announcing production downgrades and axing hundreds of jobs.

Ford announced on Tuesday that it was cutting 440 manufacturing jobs and dropping daily production from 209 to 148 vehicles in November in response to an industry-wide slump in the sale of large vehicles.

We have $5.4 billion committed through to 2020 with the auto industry, Mr Combet told reporters in Sydney.

Im not committing any funds at this point in time to anything additional.

He noted that Opposition Leader Tony Abbotts alternative policy was to take $1.5 billion in funding away from the industry.

He carries on about jobs and all these things, but hes a complete hypocrite, Mr Combet said.

Mr Combet also dismissed as completely ridiculous opposition claims the Ford job cuts were linked to pricing carbon.

It is totally wrong. It is a wilful misleading of the community to suggest that is the case, and all I can say is go and ask the CEO of Ford, he said.